Homemade Strawberry Ice Cream (bonus malted milkshake recipe from Jessie Sheehan!)

Strawberry season is a special baking time, no doubt, and making and eating strawberry pies and crumbles, and crisps couldn’t make me happier. But homemade strawberry ice cream is truly a thing to behold. Particularly, I might add, in light of the steamy weather that some of us on the East Coast have been experiencing as of late, as ice cram is perhaps the ultimate “no-bake” dessert. Ice cream is surprisingly easy to make, and yet the looks on people’s faces when you serve them up a bowl of the homemade stuff, is priceless. My recipe calls for cream as well as milk in the custard base, as I love the richness the cream imparts. And I like to macerate the strawberries in brown sugar, rather than granulated, for the very slight molasses-y flavor it provides.

To take a peek at the original blog post for my strawberry ice cream – which also includes a recipe for strawberry malted milkshakes (!) – and to peruse my collection of original recipes, click here: www.jessiesheehanbakes.com

 


 

INGREDIENTS:

  • 4 cups of washed, hulled, and sliced strawberries (ie: slice before measuring)
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1 1/2 cups heavy cream
  • 3/4 cups granulated sugar, divided (a tablespoon or two more, if your strawberries are not very sweet)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 5 yolks

DIRECTIONS:

Combine the strawberries, brown sugar, lemon juice, and vanilla in a medium-sized bowl and mash all of the ingredients together using a wooden spoon or rubber spatula. Place in the refrigerator to macerate and chill.

Whisk the milk, cream, 1/2 cup of the granulated sugar, and salt in a heavy bottomed large saucepan. Simmer the mixture over medium heat.

Meanwhile, in a medium sized bowl, whisk the yolks, and 1/4 cup of the granulated sugar until frothy. Once, the milk mixture simmers, temper the yolk mixture, by adding a little of the warm milk/cream to the yolks and whisking. Continue adding the milk/cream to the yolks, a little at a time, until the temperature of the yolks rises. Then, whisking constantly, pour the tempered yolks into the saucepan of milk/cream on the stove.

Stir the custard constantly with a wooden spoon or a heatproof spatula until it thickens slightly and – once coated in custard – your finger leaves a trail on the spoon/spatula. Do not boil.

Strain the custard (I skip this step, but straining is a good idea if you are concerned that your yolks may have curdled a bit) into a medium sized bowl and place in the refrigerator until chilled. This can take several hours, and can be sped up by placing the bowl in the freezer. If you do place it in the freezer, stir the mixture periodically to ensure it does not freeze solid.

Once chilled, combine the custard with the macerated strawberries and transfer the strawberry custard to your ice cream maker, and freeze the custard, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer to a freezer-proof container and store in the freezer until ready to use (although some of us like it straight from the machine and still a bit soft).

 

 

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